Nicholas Andry coined the word "orthopædics" in French as orthopédie, derived from the Greek words ὀρθός orthos ("correct", "straight") and παιδίον paidion ("child"), when he published Orthopedie (translated as Orthopædia: or the Art of Correcting and Preventing Deformities in Children) in 1741. Though as the name implies it was initially developed with attention to children, the correction of spinal and bony deformities in all stages of life eventually became the cornerstone of orthopedic practice.


As with many words derived with the "æ" ligature, simplification to either "ae" or just "e" is common. In the US the majority of college, university and residency programs, and even the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, still use the spelling with the Latinate digraph ae. Elsewhere, usage is not uniform; in Canada, both spellings are acceptable; orthopaedics usually prevails in the rest of the British Commonwealth, especially in the UK.


Students will acquire adequate knowledge of the basic medical subjects and advance knowledge in orthopaedic and neurological conditions, develop skills and techniques of exercise therapy and electrotherapy modalities, their application in various medical and surgical conditions and advanced concept applications in their specialized subjects. The students are also trained to demonstrate skills in handling the patients with various disorders, teaching methods, management, research guidance and counselling.

Duration 2 Years
Eligibility B.P.T./B.P.H.T with min. 50% marks